weed tolerance break

Weed Tolerance Break 101

Tolerance refers to our capacity to endure something, which ultimately results in weaker effects of the condition or the substance. This includes our bodies getting used to cannabis or weed. If you feel that this is happening to you, then it’s time to do a weed tolerance break.

How Weed Tolerance Develops

Marijuana tolerance develops when we use the substance on a regular basis. The psychoactive compound in cannabis, THC or Tetrahydrocannabinol, works by attaching to the cannabinoid type 1 or CB1 receptors in the brain. Tolerance happens when the brain gets used to the continuous presence of cannabinoids, and the CB1 receptors start to downregulate the reception of the main psychoactive compound THC. In other words, you become somewhat resistant to cannabis, and in order to get the same effects or feelings of euphoria from the drugs, you need to ingest more.

There is no definite timeline as to when tolerance starts to develop, but it can be affected by several factors, including how often you consume cannabis, how potent the cannabis is, and your personal biology.

Weed tolerance breaks, also known as tolerance holidays or t-breaks, are recommended for many reasons and have proven to be beneficial to a lot of cannabis users. A one month study to test the effects of abstinence has shown that after two days of t-breaks, our CB1 receptors start the replenishment process. They will continue to do so for the next 28 days until the process has been completed. Therefore, as the study showed, tolerance to cannabis can be quickly reversed.

How to Prepare for Weed Tolerance Breaks

While weed tolerance breaks are highly recommended for you to experience the same giggly highs you enjoyed as a novice user, they often do not come easy. Thus, like almost anything else, proper preparation is important. In this article, we aim to provide you with a guide to help you push through the adversity of a weed tolerance break.

1. Acknowledge you need the break

Acknowledging that you need the break is the first step. It is your brain and your body, after all. Most experienced cannabis users, however, will tell you that your relationship with marijuana will greatly benefit from a break. Cutting back on the frequency of your consumption might be easier an easier route to take. However, since the receptors are still being activated on a semi-regular basis, this may not have the same benefits as a full-on break.

You also need to acknowledge and prepare yourself for the difficulty of the process, especially during the first two weeks. Just like any form of addiction, you will find yourself thinking about it any time your mind starts to wander. You might also experience withdrawal symptoms, which is usual when discarding something cold turkey. These symptoms vary from person to person and are based on your personality and the level of your dependency. You can experience anything between mild discomforts like a headache or restlessness to intense symptoms such as sweating, chills, and hallucinations.

Other common weed withdrawal symptoms include depression, drastic mood changes, cognitive impairment, loss of appetite, and insomnia. While this may cause you to rethink your weed tolerance breaks, it is important to remind yourself that if many others have accomplished this process, then so can you. Besides, cannabis withdrawal symptoms are known to last for only 72 hours.

To help with the withdrawal symptoms, make sure to keep yourself hydrated and busy. Proper rest, exercise, and fresh air have all been known to effectively reduce any slumps in our moods.

2. Tell your friends about your t-break

Moral support is very important in this process, so it is best if you get to invite others who are also ready to take your tolerance breaks with you. Telling your loved ones you’re taking a break will also help you become more accountable. In addition, letting your cannabis community know curbs the peer pressure to participate in weed sessions.

How long your weed tolerance break should be will also vary from person to person. Most experienced t-breakers, however, will advise you to take nothing less than a month to ensure that your receptors are well-rested. The THC compound can remain in your system for up to 30 days, and allowing all these to flush out your system thoroughly will not only help you physically but will also make the next marijuana session more memorable.

3. Toss your stash

An effective and successful weed break requires the full out-of-sight, out-of-mind approach. So one of the common advice you’ll get is to get rid of all your cannabis stash. If you are a frequent cannabis smoker, you’ll probably have a personal stash and maybe an additional, secret stash. If you are committed to getting the total benefit of at-break, you will need to get rid of all of it. You can either smoke it all or share it with a friend – the important thing is that you purge your space of any weed.

4. Take up caffeine

This might not be popular advice when trying to accomplish total weed abstinence, but taking up caffeine actually helps. Coffee is known to create a physiological addiction that encourages dopamine releases, which makes up for the cravings you got when you used to get high on weed.

5. Stay focused

Choosing a date range for your abstinence, and having a set goal in mind will help with the much-needed will power to stick to the commitment. A self-imposed break can last as long as you see fit. There will be uncountable times when you will be tempted to break your fast, but stay focused and make a promise to yourself to stick to the break until the end. Constantly remind yourself that this brief period of discipline will end in a euphoric and rewarding experience.

Tolerance is developed for anything that is consumed regularly. This includes weed tolerance. When you no longer find yourself getting high as you used to, then it is definitely time to consider a process called weed tolerance break in order to beat that tolerance you’ve acquired.

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